Do you practice good posture at work? Follow the 90 Degree Rule!

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailby feather

What does perfect sitting posture look like? If the name of the title hasn’t given it away yet, 90 degrees is the magic number to keep in mind!

Dr. Grace Walker, physical and occupational therapist and nutritionist, shares 5 quick tips to follow the 90 degree rule.

  1. 90° angle at your neck and shoulders
  2. 90° angle at your back and legs
  3. 90° angle at your lower and upper knee
  4. 90° angle at your foot and ankle
  5. 90° angle above and below your elbow

While seated at your desk at home or work, keep these important postural cues in mind! Sitting down and working all day, you might find your head and shoulders begin to lean forward and their lower trunk begins to tilt backwards, creating a ‘slouched’ position. That’s what we are trying to avoid! Sitting with bad posture over a long period of time can also lead to nervous system problems.

By incorporating these 5 quick tips into your work day, you can be on your way to reducing incorrect posture and pain! At Walker Physical Therapy and Pain Center, we have expert physical therapists to help to increase your postural strength and relieve any pain that comes along with sitting all day at your desk. We create personalized programs for each patient to provide results in a fun, affordable, healing environment.

Call Walker Physical Therapy and Pain Center to schedule an appointment! (714)997-5518

1111 W Town and Country Road Ste 1

Orange, CA 92868

www.walkerpt.com

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestrssby feather

Sore After Work? Here are Five Ways to Fix That

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailby feather

What does perfect sitting posture look like? If the name of the title hasn’t given it away yet, 90° is the magic number to keep in mind!

What does that mean exactly? Dr. Grace Walker, physical and occupational therapist, shares 5 quick tips below will give you a better idea.

  1. 90° angle at your neck and shoulder
  2. 90° angle at your back and legs
  3. 90° angle at your lower and upper knee
  4. 90° angle at your foot and ankle
  5. 90° angle above and below your elbow
favi ergo 2 final

Walker PT Office Manager, Faviloa, demonstrates the “90 degree rule”.

While seated at your desk at home or work, keep these important postural cues in mind. Sitting down and working all day, one might find their head and shoulders begin to lean forward and their lower trunk begins to tilt backwards, creating a ‘slouched’ position.

This leads to none of the foundational postural muscles to engage, leaving the spine and shoulders vulnerable to injuries. Sitting with bad posture over a long period of time can also lead to nervous system problems.

By incorporating these 5 quick tips into your postural awareness, you can be on your way to reducing incorrect posture and pain! At Walker Physical Therapy and Pain Center, we have trained therapist to help assess your posture and design physical therapy programs to increase postural strength. We come up with personalized programs for each patient to provide results in a fun, affordable, healing environment.

Call Walker Physical Therapy and Pain Center to schedule an appointment with an expert and caring physical therapist!

1111 W. Town and Country Rd., Ste. 1

Orange, CA 92868

Phone: (714) 997-5518

www.walkerpt.com

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestrssby feather

Is Sciatica Pain Making Work Unbearable?

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailby feather

According to the American Academy of Orthopaedic Manual Physical Therapy,  physical therapy can offer the same results for patients with sciatica who have had spinal surgery. The academy reports from the British Medical Journal and states that studies have only shown short-term improvement in patients who have had surgery. After 6 months to 2 years, the difference between surgery patients and physical therapy patients diminishes.

Surgery is not only costly, but risky.

“The significance of this study is that patients may be able to avoid surgery if they realized they can expect a similar improvement in symptoms if they use other ways to manage the pain for 6 months,”

says Dr. Timothy Flynn of Regis University in Denver, CO, and President of the American Academy of Orthopedic Manual Physical Therapists (AAOMPT).

Grace Walker, physical and occupational therapist and nutritionist encourages patients to become educated about their sciatic and back pain. She agrees with Timothy Flynn in his statement:

“Patients should be aware that surgery is not the only option to reduce the symptoms of sciatica.”

Click here to read more.

Call Walker Physical Therapy & Pain Center to schedule an appointment. Treatment is affordable and effective!

714-997-5518

1111 W. Town & Country Rd. Ste.1

Orange, Ca 92868

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestrssby feather

Worplace Ergonomics- Monitors: More Important Than You May Think! Part 3 of 4

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailby feather

businesswoman working on laptop with neck pain

Dr. Grace Walker, physical and occupational therapist, shares tips on how to design an ergonomic workspace! This is a four part series, today being part 3 of 4. We will be looking at the ergonomic placement and utilization of your computer monitor.

Finding the correct monitor and placing it in the proper position helps reduce exposure to forceful exertions and awkward postures. On top of easing shoulder and neck tension, this helps to prevent other adverse effects such as excessive fatigue and eye strain.

Here are four quick tips to keep in mind when selecting and positioning your computer monitor.

  1. Put your monitor directly in front of you and at least 20 inches away. Viewing distances that are too long can cause you to lean forward and strain to see small text. Distances that are too short may require you to sit in awkward positions to be able to read correctly.
  2. Position the monitor so the top line is at or below eye level. A quick solution for raising the monitor is either a new monitor stand or a stack of wide, heavy books. A display screen that is too high or low will cause you to work with your head, neck or back in awkward positions.
  3. Place your monitor perpendicular to any windows to prevent eye stain due to a glare on the screen. Eye strain can eventually lead to neck and shoulder stain from leaning in to see past glare.
  4. Laptops and tablets are the least ergonomic form of computing! The benefits of using a desktop computer include the ability to adjust the height and distance of the monitor and space computer components, such as the keyboard and mouse, away from each other. Use laptops and tablets only when you must.

At Walker Physical Therapy and Pain Center, we have the ability to address all of the potential variables that may be causing pain related to lack of ergonomic support and repetitive motion injuries that may occur at home or in the workplace. We specialize in working to find the root cause of your ailments, and correcting them.

We come up with personalized programs for each patient to provide results in a fun and healing environment that is affordable. Call Walker Physical Therapy and Pain Center to schedule an appointment with an expert and caring physical therapist!

1111 W. Town and Country Rd., Ste. 1

Orange, CA 92868

Phone: (714) 997-5518

http://walkerpt.com

 

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestrssby feather

Workplace Ergonomics- Chairish the Hot Seat! Part 1 of 4.

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailby feather

sleep at work illustration

Dr. Grace Walker, physical and occupational therapist, shares tips on how to design an ergonomic workspace! This will be a four part series, starting today with the importance of choosing a good chair.

Prolonged use of equipment at home or at work that is not ergonomic can lead to many ailments such as carpal tunnel, ulnar and medial nerve inflammation, and also shoulder, neck and back pain.

A good chair is an important investment, just as important as picking a good mattress. There is a good chance you spend just as much time, if not more, sitting in your chair as you do sleeping in your bed! Here are three important tips to consider next time you are in your chair at work or if you are shopping for a new chair.

  1. Chair backs should conform to your back, and the chair should raise up high enough to keep your shoulders at east when you work.
  2. The seat should allow your feet to rest flat on the floor or on a footrest.
  3. Armrest should be soft and allow your shoulders to be relaxed when used.

At Walker Physical Therapy and Pain Center, we have the ability to address all of the potential variables that may be causing pain related to lack of ergonomic support and repetitive motion injuries that may occur at home or in the workplace. We specialize in working to find the root cause of your ailments, and correcting them.

We come up with personalized programs for each patient to provide results in a fun and healing environment. Call Walker Physical Therapy and Pain Center to schedule an appointment with an expert and caring physical therapist!

 

Stay tuned for the next installment of our Workplace Ergonomics series!

 

1111 W. Town and Country Rd., Ste. 1

Orange, CA 92868

Phone: (714) 997-5518

www.walkerpt.com

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestrssby feather