6 Tips For Better Bike Fitment

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Woman sets height of bicycle saddle before cycling - studio shoot

Dr. Grace Walker, physical and occupational therapist, knows seat discomfort can be the difference between an enjoyable ride, and a miserable one. It can stop both men and women from riding all together! Why can seat pain be such a pain in the butt?

The bones that are used when sitting, ischial tuberosities (aka- sits-bones), are not utilized by most bicycle seats.

You may have a perfectly comfortable saddle, however there are many variables involved in bike fitting; you might find some of these variables are affecting your comfort. Some quick things to check that may be affecting your comfort are as follows.

  1. Poor or Worn Saddle
  2. Improper Saddle Tilt
  3. Saddle is Too High
  4. Saddle is Positioned Too Far Back
  5. The Drop Between the Saddle and Handlebars is Too Much
  6. The Handlebar Reach is Too Far

Some preventative measures that can be implemented to increase comfort are

  1. Building strength in areas that are in contact with your saddle
  2. Reduce Your Weight
  3. Protective Bike Short
  4. Get off the Saddle Regularly
  5. Allow time to adapt to your equipment

At Walker Physical Therapy and Pain Center, we provide personalized programs to help you lose weight and build strength in the areas you need to comfortably cycle or enjoy any sport for years to come. Whether you are recovering from an injury, or simply interested in a maintenance program to continue doing the activities you love, our therapists will work with you to design an affordable treatment program specifically for you!

Visit our website at WalkerPT.com and call our office at Walker Physical Therapy and Pain Center today to schedule an appointment with an expert and caring therapist today!

1111 W. Town and Country Rd.

Orange, CA 92868

(714) 997-5518

www.walkerpt.com

See Three Steps to Saddle Comfort By Tom Demerly and Saddle Discomfort—Solutions for Women Cyclists for more detailed information on saddle comfort tips!

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Physical Therapy: Essential to Recovery from Sports Injuries

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Grace Walker, physical & occupational therapist and nutritionist agrees with author Darice Britt from South University who states that rehabilitation of an injured athlete should be carefully evaluated and monitored on a daily basis.

Physical therapists carefully examine the injured athlete to determine whether there are weak or inflexible muscles in the body that could cause future injury. They are trained to target specific joints and muscles in the body through exercise, manual therapy, and pressure point release techniques that help rebuild strength and movement of the body after injury.

Since injuries are time-dependent, the normal healing process follows a pattern of acute phase, subacute phase, and chronic phase.

“Each phase dictates a different treatment approach and it is the physical therapist’s responsibility to accurately diagnose which phase and what treatment the patient should receive”  Says Apostolos Theophilou, DPT, clinical coordinator of the Physical Therapist Assisting program at South University

Theophilou also says:

“Through the years, therapists have been successfully able to log the ‘steps’ for each phase, thus now we have collective treatment protocols that have a complete analysis of what activities and treatments the athlete should be receiving based on his current phase”

Call Walker Physical Therapy & Pain Center to schedule an appointment with an expert physical therapist!

To read the full article, click here

714-997-5518

1111 W. Town & Country Rd. Ste. 1

Orange, CA 92868

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4 Ways You’re Making Your Knee Pain Worse

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Do you ever ask yourself, “Am I doing the right things to reduce my knee pain?” or, “Are the things I’m doing making my knee pain worse?” Dr. Grace Walker, physical and occupational therapist, has worked with countless patients who suffer from knee pain. Everyone who has dealt with knee pain is aware how much it slows life down.

Senior man suffering for osteoarthritis of the knee

 

Before you go on diagnosing yourself (we’ve all done it), it is important to see a doctor or physical therapist to give you a correct diagnosis. Without one, you could be doing more bad, than good.

Read through this list and ask yourself, again, whether you are taking the right steps to reducing your knee pain.

 

 

  1. Running on hard surfaces

If you were running multiple miles on the regular, and have been diagnosed with osteoarthritis or another cause of knee pain, it might be time to adjust your fitness regimen.  The impact caused by running, especially on hard surfaces, is very hard on your knees. If you are committed to running, and find your knee pain is becoming unbearable, consider running on a softer surface. Many schools have padded running surfaces on their tracks.

 

  1. Taking it too easy

Rest is a crucial part of recovering from a knee injury. However, if your doctor clears you for exercise, it might mean it’s actually time to start.

Start with low impact exercises, such as swimming or cycling. Activities such as tai-chi or yoga help increase flexibility. For inflammatory conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis, stiffness improves with activity. For those with RA, it is important to find the threshold of rest and movement. A physical therapist can help you design a strengthening program to build and maintain the muscles that support your knees, too.

 

  1. Every pound counts

If you are overweight, there are plenty of reasons to try and change that. Knee pain is one of them. It’s pretty straight forward– less weight equals less joint damage equals less pain.

If you are overweight, you are at a higher risk of developing osteoarthritis and other conditions.  However, losing weight can slow the progression of arthritis one you have it.

 

  1. Get the right gear

We’ve discussed it before- your flip-flops, Uggs, and flat-soled Vans are not the best footwear to take walking or exercising.  Shoes with support, such as athletic shoes, will be more accommodating.

The same goes for that drug-store knee brace. Relying on generic braces may be putting a bandage on a major wound. If you have recurring pain, talk to your doctor about getting fitted for a proper, load-bearing brace.

 

At Walker Physical Therapy and Pain Center, we have the ability to help address all of the potential variables that may be causing knee pain. We look at the “whole person” when treating knee pain to provide insights as to why one might be experiencing excess strain on  their knees, but also in the hips,  ankles and even a weak “Core”. We also look at our patients Body Mass Index as well as the daily activities demand.

We come up with personalized programs for each patient to provide results in a fun and healing environment.

Call us at (714) 997-5518 if you would like to discuss out program in detail.

 

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6 Areas of Bike Fitting That Can Leave You With Sore Buns!

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Woman sets height of  bicycle saddle before cycling - studio shoot

Dr. Grace Walker, physical and occupational therapist, knows seat discomfort can be the difference between an enjoyable ride, and a miserable one. It can stop both men and women from riding all together! Why can seat pain be such a pain in the butt?

The bones that are used when sitting, ischial tuberosities (aka- sits-bones), are not utilized by most bicycle seats.

You may have a perfectly comfortable saddle, however there are many variables involved in bike fitting; you might find some of these variables are affecting your comfort. Some quick things to check that may be affecting your comfort are as follows.

  1. Poor or Worn Saddle
  2. Improper Saddle Tilt
  3. Saddle is Too High
  4. Saddle is Positioned Too Far Back
  5. The Drop Between the Saddle and Handlebars is Too Much
  6. The Handlebar Reach is Too Far

Some preventative measures that can be implemented to increase comfort are

  1. Building strength in areas that are in contact with your saddle
  2. Reduce Your Weight
  3. Protective Bike Short
  4. Get off the Saddle Regularly
  5. Allow time to adapt to your equipment

At Walker Physical Therapy and Pain Center, we provide personalized programs to help you lose weight and build strength in the areas you need to comfortably cycle or enjoy any sport for years to come. Whether you are recovering from an injury, or simply interested in a maintenance program to continue doing the activities you love, our therapists will work with you to design an affordable treatment program specifically for you!

Visit our website at WalkerPT.com and call our office at Walker Physical Therapy and Pain Center today to schedule an appointment with an expert and caring therapist today!

1111 W. Town and Country Rd.

Orange, CA 92868

(714) 997-5518

www.walkerpt.com

See Three Steps to Saddle Comfort By Tom Demerly and Saddle Discomfort—Solutions for Women Cyclists for more detailed information on saddle comfort tips!

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Prevention:Follow these instructions to avoid concussions! Dr. Grace Walker shares vital tips.

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A football helmet and doctors hand holding a stethoscope on the crown of the helmet. Sports Concussion Concept, and related conditions, CTE, Alzheimer's, Parkinson's.

Dr. Grace Walker, physical and occupation therapist, shares a few simple tips regarding physical therapy to avoid concussions, as well as advice for fitting helmets.

In early days, the use of helmets in many sports originally came about as an effort to avoid grisly accidents, such as fractured skulls and broken necks. While they succeeded in reducing those traumatic injuries, they did little to protect athletes from concussions.

What is a concussion? The CDC classifies a concussion as “a bump, blow, or jolt to the head or a hit to the body that causes the head and brain to move rapidly back and forth.” Concussions can be avoided in different ways. One way is through neck strengthening, The Journal of Primary Prevention has published this article covering lack of neck strength and its relationship with concussions.

The other is a proper fitting and functioning helmet. Here are some tips to consider when you’re out shopping for a helmet; these pertain to many different type of helmets. Here are three tips to consider when choosing a helmet for your activities.

 

1. Make sure your helmet fits. Be careful of hair alterations and wearing caps or bandanas underneath the helmet after you have spent the time to have it fitted.

2. Many sports equipment stores and manufacturers are able to give recommendations about what size helmet will fit you by taking simple measurement. Click here to see a fitment video by Riddell football helmets.

3. Buying a helmet is an investment. Don’t go with the bare minimum; your well-being may depend on it.

 

For more information on helmet fitment, see Chris G. Koutures, MD FAAP pediatric and sports medicine specialists blog by clicking this link!

At Walker Physical Therapy and Pain Center, we have trained therapists to help design physical therapy programs to increase neck strength, which is a factor in reducing concussions. We come up with personalized programs for each patient to provide results in a fun and healing environment.

Call Walker Physical Therapy and Pain Center to schedule an appointment with an expert and caring physical therapist!

 

1111 W. Town and Country Rd., Ste. 1

 

Orange, CA 92868

 

Phone: (714) 997-5518

 

www.walkerpt.com

 

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A whole body workout

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Grace Walker, physical and occupational therapist & nutritionist says that functional fitness is the way to go.

If you are trying to lose weight or just tone up; and especially if you want to avoid injury while playing sports or during your simple daily routine, functional training provides a whole body workout.

Some of the training exercises involve squatting, lunging, bending, twisting, pushing or pulling.

Training this way helps condition your body to move more efficiently through your daily living or real-life activities which helps prevent injury.

All areas of our body are connected and movement occurs across three planes:

  • The right and left sides of the body
  • The front and back of the body
  • The transverse plane which divides the body into top and bottom and is where most rotational movement occurs.

A functional deficit in one area can negatively affect movement patterns in another. This is why it is beneficial to look at the whole body to improve health and achieve optimal performance.

Angie Ferguson from news-press.com says:

The key to proper and effective functional training is assessment… Assessments should include a thorough health history, lifestyle factors, postural assessment and training analysis. Extra attention should be paid to any postural and muscular imbalances and movement restrictions. Once these have been determined, flexibility and core strength can be addressed.

Angie Ferguson is an exercise physiologist from Fort Myers. She is a USA Triathlon Advanced Level 2 coach, USA Cycling coach and has a Specialty in Sports Nutrition certification. 

Angie tells us some benefits of functional training:

  • Ultimate time management. Multi-joint exercises (like a squat) work a multitude of muscles at the same time, making your workout more efficient. Ideal for a busy lifestyle.

  • Challenge. These types of workouts challenge you because a lot of the movements are multi-planer or move through multiple motions, as we do in life.
  • Massive core-strengthening benefits. It engages the body’s core stabilizing and balancing muscles. These types of exercises put less stress on your muscles and joints, and help improve coordination, balance, and stability.

  • Can be very sport specific and therefore enhance your skills in any sport. The bottom line is functional fitness training is all about getting stronger.

Contact Walker Physical Therapy & Pain Center to schedule an assessment with one of our expert physical therapists!

714-997-5518

1111 W. Town and Country Rd. Ste.1

Orange, Ca 92868

 

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