It’s Obvious These Four Celebrities Love Physical Therapy

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Photo by C Flanigan/Getty Images

 

Dr. Grace Walker, physical and occupational therapist and nutritionist at Walker Physical Therapy and Pain Center is pleased to share this article recently published InStyle magazine.

From infrared saunas to freezing in the sub-zero temperatures of a cryotherapy machine, celebs and the fitness-obsessed will try just about anything to maintain their inner glow. And often times it’s Hollywood that introduces the rest of us to the hottest wellness trends that are about to make it mainstream. Case in point: physical therapy. This once daunting pain management therapy reserved for this recovering from surgery or injury has shifted its place in the wellness space, becoming a hot new addition to celebrities’ workout routines, whether they are injured or not.

The physical therapy guru behind Jennifer Aniston’s fit frame and P. Diddy’s healthy lifestyle is Dr. Karen Joubert. We asked Joubert why her clients are turning to physical therapy as a compliment to their workout routines, and how it’s changing their bodies.

“The clientele I work with are under an enormous amount of pressure and in many cases, this will manifest itself physically,” she says. “Artists can perform 4-7 shows a week along with traveling and trying to maintain a healthy diet, it’s a lot for anyone to handle. Physical therapy teaches them proper mechanics whether its basic posture on the screen and or extreme dance moves on stage. Education and maintenance provide them with longevity and prevention of injuries. In the long run, it’s a win-win for everyone.”

But why the sudden shift in how people are viewing the benefits of physical therapy, as opposed to just having to go to a session to heal an injury? “The desire for wellness and longevity has really helped to bring physical therapy to the forefront,” she says. “Recently, there has been a huge push in the longevity and prevention aspect of medicine. The public is turning more and more to physical therapy to help them understand and manage their pain. Who doesn’t want to feel better and do it with the guidance of a good physical therapist instead of popping addictive medications? Becoming in touch with the body can be a game changer in every aspect of one’s life.”

As for her favorite clients who dedicate themselves to regular sessions, she has a few in mind. “My favorites, include Puffy, Jennifer Aniston, Cher, and Serena Williams,” she says. “I challenge anyone to follow their daily raegimen. I can’t even keep up! They are so disciplined in all aspects of their lives, no wonder they are all successful! And YES, they all do physical therapy 3-5 times a week!

If you are interested in managing or preventing pain with the help of physical therapy, call Walker Physical Therapy and Pain Center at (714) 997-5518 to have an evaluation with one of our expert physical therapists!

 

Walker Physical Therapy and Pain Center

1111 W. Town and Country Rd., Ste. 1

Orange, CA 92868

(714) 997-5518

www.walkerpt.com

 

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Is Sciatica Pain Making Work Unbearable?

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According to the American Academy of Orthopaedic Manual Physical Therapy,  physical therapy can offer the same results for patients with sciatica who have had spinal surgery. The academy reports from the British Medical Journal and states that studies have only shown short-term improvement in patients who have had surgery. After 6 months to 2 years, the difference between surgery patients and physical therapy patients diminishes.

Surgery is not only costly, but risky.

“The significance of this study is that patients may be able to avoid surgery if they realized they can expect a similar improvement in symptoms if they use other ways to manage the pain for 6 months,”

says Dr. Timothy Flynn of Regis University in Denver, CO, and President of the American Academy of Orthopedic Manual Physical Therapists (AAOMPT).

Grace Walker, physical and occupational therapist and nutritionist encourages patients to become educated about their sciatic and back pain. She agrees with Timothy Flynn in his statement:

“Patients should be aware that surgery is not the only option to reduce the symptoms of sciatica.”

Click here to read more.

Call Walker Physical Therapy & Pain Center to schedule an appointment. Treatment is affordable and effective!

714-997-5518

1111 W. Town & Country Rd. Ste.1

Orange, Ca 92868

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Dr. Grace Walker with 3 Tips to Avoid Slip and Fall Injuries

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Dr. Grace Walker, physical and occupational therapist and nutritionist, sees countless slip and fall injuries every year. They are more common than you’d expect!  ¼ of Americans over the age of 65 fall each year. Every 11 seconds, an older adult is treated in the emergency room for a fall. It is not just older populations that need to be careful- falls can happen to anyone.

“All too often, people take their footing for granted. It’s typical for someone to walk around at full speed without ever looking down at the ground. This may be fine when there are no obstacles and the ground is made of something that gives good traction, but it can result in tripping or slipping if there’s something unexpected in the way or the ground has become icy,” says Dr. Samantha Stuart, D.C. from Portland, Oregon.

We’re sure you don’t need too much convincing on the topic of how detrimental falls can be. Are you curious how you and your loved ones might be able to avoid becoming one of these statistics? Here are 3 tips to keep in mind.

  1. Slip and fall accidents often happen in icy, wet, oily or slick conditions. Sidewalks, which are normally safe, become slippery and dangerous. Painted crosswalks on the road become very slippery when they are damp. Even in better weather conditions, some dirt on the ground could have you flailing like a mad-man to keep your balance!
  2. Remember to look down while you are walking. Many accidents stem from tripping over objects, or slipping on wet surfaces. Practice quick intervention by quickly cleaning any water spilled in the home, or clearing your path of objects left by you or your children.
  3. If you are have fallen once or more, speak with your doctor. There may be a reason you have fallen that you are not aware of. The issue might even be correctable, such as balance or an unusual gait or walking pattern.

 

If you have fallen, or feel you are risk for falling, call Walker Physical Therapy & Pain Center to start your personalized plan of care for vestibular rehabilitation with an expert physical therapist!

Walker Physical Therapy and Pain Center

714-997-5518

1111 W. Town & Country Rd. Ste. 1

Orange, CA 92868

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Two (very) Good Reasons to Limit Your Flip-flop Use

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Now that it’s August, summer is undoubtedly in full swing (if you couldn’t tell already)! Dr. Grace Walker, Physical and Occupational Therapist, knows that summer means sandal weather, right? For many of us, that is true. However, continue reading to learn why it might be best to limit how often you are in your flip-flops.

close up of female legs in sandals walking on forest road

  1. They lack support– “The let your foot be as flat as they can be,” says Jim Christina, director of scientific affairs at the American Podiatric Medical Association. If your foot is too flat, you aren’t getting any support. This can lead to a number of conditions and injuries, such as plantar fasciitis– inflammation of tissue on the underside of your feet, or hammertoe– which causes the knuckles of your toes to arch upwards. Sandals also lack ankle support and are more difficult to recover from missteps or tripping, making you susceptible to falls and a number of other injuries.

 

  1. They are not hygienic– You probably could have guessed that sandals are not supportive, but give this idea some thoughtwhen was the last time you washed your sandals? No, not just splashing them with the hose- were talking about a deep, hard scrub. The New York Times took flip-flops from their staff and sent them to a lab. Inside the foam they found Staphylococcus aureus, known to cause (your guessed it) Staph infections. To top things off, the lab also found 18,100 other harmful bacteria on the sandals.

Contact Walker Physical Therapy & Pain Center to schedule an assessment with one of our expert physical therapists!

714-997-5518

1111 W. Town and Country Rd. Ste.1

Orange, Ca 92868

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Functional Fitness: What is it? How do I do it?

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Grace Walker, physical and occupational therapist & nutritionist says that functional fitness is the way to go.

If you are trying to lose weight or just tone up; and especially if you want to avoid injury while playing sports or during your simple daily routine, functional training provides a whole body workout.

Some of the training exercises involve squatting, lunging, bending, twisting, pushing or pulling.

Training this way helps condition your body to move more efficiently through your daily living or real-life activities which helps prevent injury.

All areas of our body are connected and movement occurs across three planes:

  • The right and left sides of the body
  • The front and back of the body
  • The transverse plane which divides the body into top and bottom and is where most rotational movement occurs.

A functional deficit in one area can negatively affect movement patterns in another. This is why it is beneficial to look at the whole body to improve health and achieve optimal performance.

Angie Ferguson from news-press.com says:

The key to proper and effective functional training is assessment… Assessments should include a thorough health history, lifestyle factors, postural assessment and training analysis. Extra attention should be paid to any postural and muscular imbalances and movement restrictions. Once these have been determined, flexibility and core strength can be addressed.

Angie Ferguson is an exercise physiologist from Fort Myers. She is a USA Triathlon Advanced Level 2 coach, USA Cycling coach and has a Specialty in Sports Nutrition certification. 

Angie tells us some benefits of functional training:

  • Ultimate time management. Multi-joint exercises (like a squat) work a multitude of muscles at the same time, making your workout more efficient. Ideal for a busy lifestyle.

  • Challenge. These types of workouts challenge you because a lot of the movements are multi-planer or move through multiple motions, as we do in life.
  • Massive core-strengthening benefits. It engages the body’s core stabilizing and balancing muscles. These types of exercises put less stress on your muscles and joints, and help improve coordination, balance, and stability.

  • Can be very sport specific and therefore enhance your skills in any sport. The bottom line is functional fitness training is all about getting stronger.

Contact Walker Physical Therapy & Pain Center to schedule an assessment with one of our expert physical therapists!

714-997-5518

1111 W. Town and Country Rd. Ste.1

Orange, Ca 92868

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Program for Vestibular Rehabilitation

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Grace Walker, physical & occupational therapist and nutritionist says: ” Even if you feel a little less balanced than you used to, or only had a minor fall, you are still at risk and will benefit from the Better Balance Program.”

It has been estimated that at least 20% of patients who present to their physician with vertigo have Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (BPPV). Usually, patients with BPPV report:

  • Dizziness that may be triggered by head movements
  • Unsteadiness
  • Falling or near falling
  • Visual &/or visual disturbance

Dizziness leads to falls and for people over the age of 50, falling is NOT a normal part of aging

-Grace Walker

Call Walker Physical Therapy & Pain Center to start your personalized plan of care for vestibular rehabilitation with an expert physical therapist!

714-997-5518

1111 W. Town & Country Rd. Ste. 1

Orange, CA 92868

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3 Tips to Improve Great Toe Mobility

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Dr. Grace Walker, Physical and Occupational Therapist and Nutritionist shares 3 tips from Russ Manalastas, injury zone blogger, on how to improve great toe mobility

Democrat & Chronicle, Russ Manalastas, injury zone blogger  9:04 a.m. EDT August 27, 2015

Many runners are well aware that the foot/ankle area is important for a runner. It initiates contact with the ground and is important for the launch-off phase of running/walking to set you in motion

However, the great toe is an area that often goes unattended. Most people are aware of maintaining proper mobility through the ankle, but the role the great toe plays during the launch-off phase of running can’t be overlooked, since a lack of mobility in this area can lead to other complications. This is why great toe extension is paramount!

Due to range of motion limitations in the great toe, the absence of great toe extension exercises can lead to the plantar fascia having to do more work during the launch off phase of running, which can lead to overburdening the tissue and causing irritation.

Normal range of motion in the great toe can be anywhere from 70 to 90 degrees, so anything that is less than that can lead to increased stiffness in the joint over time..

3 TIPS TO IMPROVE GREAT TOE MOBILITY

Tip 1

Check your mobility in your great toe by pulling up on the toe (foot on the ground) to see if you have any limitations. The key is to keep your other toes relaxed as there is a tendency to want to extend all the toes to gain any extra range of motion. This easy test should give you a good idea of whether or not you may need to work on regaining mobility.

Tip 2

Address soft tissue restrictions through the calf and also the bottom of the foot. Any increased restrictions or tightness through these areas may restrict your great toe from moving into end range extension.

Tip 3

PT Erson Religioso III recommends end range great toe flexion to help reset the great toe and to allow it to move into extension without trying to force that motion over and over again.

 

Russ Manalastas is a licensed physical therapist and clinical director for Lattimore of Spencerport Physical Therapy.

 

Call Walker Physical Therapy & Pain Center to make an appointment with one of our expert physical therapists!

(714)997-5518

1111 W. Town and Country Rd.

Orange, CA 92868

 

 

http://www.democratandchronicle.com/story/lifestyle/her/blogs/community/2015/08/27/the-injury-zone-great-toe-mobility/32469435/

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