Walker Physical Therapy and Pain Center Memorial Day Remembrance

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailby feather

Grace Walker, physical and occupational therapist and nutritionist, remembers those who have served our great country on Memorial Day.

 

“Our debt to the heroic men and valiant women in the service of our country can never be repaid. They have earned our undying gratitude. America will never forget their sacrifices.”

                – President Harry S. Truman

 

In observance of Memorial Day and in honor of those who have served our incredible country, Walker Physical Therapy and Pain Center will be closed on Monday May 29th, 2017.

 

Walker Physical Therapy and Pain Center

1111 W. Town and Country Rd., Ste. 1

Orange, CA 92868

(714) 997-5519

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestrssby feather

Selfie Elbow- Yes, We’re Serious

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailby feather

Walker PT & Pain Center Office Manager, Faviola, might be needing some treatment for that Selfie Elbow!

Selfie elbow, the latest tech-related injury. Yet another injury add to the list alongside the smartphone claw, neck injuries from using tablets, and carpal tunnel from typing. Hoda Kotb, the host of “Today”, told Elle that her doctor believes that her selfie addiction has caused her elbow pain. The awkward grip she was using while extending her arm is the perfect concoction of contorted movement to cause pain.

Doctor Grace Walker, physical and occupational therapist and nutritionist says, “These injuries are nothing new. They are variations of old fashioned repetitive strain injuries that have been around as long as there have been jobs. The movement that most people use to take selfies is similar to many movements done by mechanics, electricians, and other workers. This movement shouldn’t irritate people who only take a few selfies. People who take multiple selfies everyday should keep an eye on the symptoms listed below.

Similar to golfer’s elbow or tennis elbow, selfie elbow got its name by the movement or action that causes the pain. Symptoms are the result of inflammation of the tendons that pass through the elbow. This pain can occur in anyone who strains the tendons of the forearm and is not limited to selfie addicts.

Symptoms of selfie elbow are-

  • Tenderness in the elbow.
  • Elbow pain when using your arms (such as lifting, writing or driving).
  • Numbness or tingling in the elbow down to the hand.

So, what can you do if you are affected by selfie elbow? The first thing you should do is stop with the selfies! You’re not likely to have a repetitive motion injury if you stop repeating a motion! Selfie elbow, like golfer and tennis elbow, is caused by inflammation of the tendons that run through the elbow. To reduce inflammation, limit movement, use ice (especially after movement) and start stretching. Some good stretches to combat pain are tendon glides and forearm stretches. Tendon glides and stretches allow the tendon to reach its greatest amount of movement and help reduce swelling.

At Walker Physical Therapy and Pain Center, we specialize in repetitive motion injuries. Whether you have become injured from work, sports, or other activities (selfies), we have a rehabilitation program for you. Call us at (714) 997-5518 to set up an evaluation with one of our expert physical therapists.

 

Walker Physical Therapy and Pain Center

1111 W. Town and Country Rd., Ste. 1

Orange, CA

92868

(714) 997-5518

www.walkerpt.com

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestrssby feather

Is Sciatica Pain Making Work Unbearable?

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailby feather

According to the American Academy of Orthopaedic Manual Physical Therapy,  physical therapy can offer the same results for patients with sciatica who have had spinal surgery. The academy reports from the British Medical Journal and states that studies have only shown short-term improvement in patients who have had surgery. After 6 months to 2 years, the difference between surgery patients and physical therapy patients diminishes.

Surgery is not only costly, but risky.

“The significance of this study is that patients may be able to avoid surgery if they realized they can expect a similar improvement in symptoms if they use other ways to manage the pain for 6 months,”

says Dr. Timothy Flynn of Regis University in Denver, CO, and President of the American Academy of Orthopedic Manual Physical Therapists (AAOMPT).

Grace Walker, physical and occupational therapist and nutritionist encourages patients to become educated about their sciatic and back pain. She agrees with Timothy Flynn in his statement:

“Patients should be aware that surgery is not the only option to reduce the symptoms of sciatica.”

Click here to read more.

Call Walker Physical Therapy & Pain Center to schedule an appointment. Treatment is affordable and effective!

714-997-5518

1111 W. Town & Country Rd. Ste.1

Orange, Ca 92868

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestrssby feather

New Medical Equipment to Help Regain Hand Movement After Stroke

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailby feather

   Dr. Grace Walker, physical and occupational therapist and nutritionist, has some very exciting news for those who might be affected by stroke. People who are affected by a stroke sometimes have to relearn to talk and walk again, dress themselves, and pick up objects on their own. The recovery from stroke can be exhausting both mentally and physically. Though it is difficult, it is not impossible. Especially with the help of an expert physical therapist.

When someone has a stroke, blood flow to an area of the brain is cut off. The result is the brain cells are deprived of oxygen and begin to die. When those cells die, the area that the brain controls, such as speech or movement, is affected. According to stroke.org, each year, nearly 800,000 people experience a new or recurrent stroke. Occupational therapist Shelly Kitrell says that, “brain cells that weren’t affected by stroke can be trained to perform functions that the damaged brain cells once did. Repetitive physical tasks help the brain tap into this ability.”

   New assistive devices and medical equipment are exciting. It is always impressive to see how medical equipment is designed and redesigned to reflect newly released evidence-based research.

   Enter the SaeboFlex. The SaeboFlex is a device that is fitted over the palm and forearm. It uses spring tension to assist the fingers in movement in an effort to retrain the brain. It works off the same principles that an assisted-pull up machine works, if that helps makes sense. If the device was attached to someone who had full range of motion and strength, it would feel like they were able to lift or curl their finger with minimal effort.

   Why is this important? Shelly Kitrell says “(those affected by stroke) can start rewiring or retraining the brain to be able to open and close the hand… The more you go without the use of one side (of your body), the more your brain says, ‘I don’t really have that arm. It doesn’t work anymore… You have to fool the brain to rewire it so that you can get the function back again.”

Once a patient is able to move their fingers, they can begin to build strength in their forearm. Once they build forearm strength, they can begin working on elbow and upper arm strength. Once they have gained upper arm strength, they can start shoulder strengthening. Starting to get the idea?

   At Walker Physical Therapy and Pain Center, our expert physical therapists specialize in stroke rehabilitation. If you or someone you know is recovering from stroke, feel free to call us at (714) 997-5518. We not only specialize in physical therapy treatment, but are current on new evidence based research and assistive medical equipment to make your recovery as swift as possible.

Walker Physical Therapy and Pain Center

1111 W. Town and Country Rd., Ste. 1

Orange, CA 92868

(714) 997-5518

www.walkerpt.com

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestrssby feather

National School Backpack Awareness Day: 4 Back-to-School Tips

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailby feather

 

 

Today, September 21st, 2016 is recognized as National School Backpark Awareness Day!

Did you know that 64% of American students ages 11 to 15 years reported back pain related to heavy backpacks? Dr. Grace Walker, physical and occupational therapist, has a few tips to share with you to help you and your loved ones utilize proper bag usage. Here are a 4 tips to follow to save your body!

Adorable 3 year old child knocked backwards from a heavy back pack over white background.

 

  1. Keep the Weight Down– A backpack should weigh no more than 10% of the students total body weight. Use those lockers!

 

  1. Keep the Straps Tight– Keep the backpack close to your body. It should extend from approximately 2 inches below the shoulder blades to slightly about the waist.

 

 

  1. Evenly Distribute the Weight– Always wear the backpack on both shoulders so that the weight is evenly distributed. Put heavier items closer to your back.

 

  1. Keep an Eye Out– If you or your child is adjusting his or her posture while carrying a backpack, it is too heavy. Also, catching any aches and pains head on it the best way to avoid potential serious injury.

 

Here at Walker PT & Pain Center, we strive for success and freedom from pain in every area of the body. With our revolutionary techniques based on over ten years of research, and team of dedicated, caring staff, we provide fast, effective solutions for pain in a fun and healing environment. Call Walker Physical Therapy & Pain Center today at 714-997-5518 to set up your initial appointment to get you back on track towards a fun-filled, action-packed, and pain free school year!

 

Walker Physical Therapy and Pain Center

1111 W. Town and Country Blvd, Ste. 1

Orange, CA 92868

(714) 997-5518

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestrssby feather